Article

Eye movements and concurrent event-related potentials: Eye fixation-related potential investigations in reading

Thierry Baccino

in The Oxford Handbook of Eye Movements

Published in print August 2011 | ISBN: 9780199539789
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199539789.013.0047

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 Eye movements and concurrent event-related potentials: Eye fixation-related potential investigations in reading

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  • Cognitive Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

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The eye-fixation related potential (EFRP) technique is based on electroencephalogram (EEG) measurements of electrical brain activity in response to eye fixations. EFRPs are extracted from the EEG by means of signal averaging but in contrast to conventional event-related potential (ERP) technique the averaged waveforms are time-locked to the onset and offset of eye fixation, not to the onset of stimulus events. EFRPs have shown to be a useful technique, in addition to eye movement recordings, to investigate early lexical processes and for establishing a timeline of these processes during reading. Moreover, the technique permits one to analyse the EEGs in a natural condition allowing the investigation of complex visual stimuli such as visual scenes or three-dimensional images. However, some challenges remain to be solved. Among them, we discuss the saccadic contamination and the overlap effects that may distort the findings and we propose some suggestions that might improve these issues. EFRPs may also represent a point of interest for many applications involving tools for disabled people, video games, or brain–computer interfaces.

Keywords: eye-fixation related potential; eye movements; reading; lexical processes; cognitive measurement

Article.  8094 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology ; Cognitive Neuroscience

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