Article

Judges

Timothy K. Beal

in The Oxford Handbook of English Literature and Theology

Published in print March 2009 | ISBN: 9780199544486
Published online September 2009 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199544486.003.0014

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Religion and Theology

Judges

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Religion
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Christianity
  • Judaism and Jewish Studies
  • Religious Studies

GO

Preview

Like the literature that precedes and follows in the Hebrew Bible, the book of Judges is clearly the product of a complicated literary history involving the early formation and deformation of Israel in the land of Canaan. It is a book whose coherence is in many ways found in its dissymmetry. In recent decades, such tensions between surface structure and deep chaos, and predictable repetition and disturbing interruption, have made the book of Judges a significant focus of study for new literary approaches in biblical studies. The book of Judges may be divided into three main parts: 1: 1–3: 6, accounts of tribal conquest and failure in Canaan; 3: 7–16: 31, the cycles of thirteen judges who delivered Israelites from oppression by other peoples; and 17: 1–21: 25, narratives of atrocity, civil war, and collapse among the tribes of Israel.

Keywords: Hebrew Bible; book of Judges; Canaan; theological chaos; tribal conquest; Israelites

Article.  7442 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Philosophy of Religion ; Christianity ; Judaism and Jewish Studies ; Religious Studies

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »