Article

Recognizing the Faces of Other Species: What Can a Limited Skill Tell Us About Face Processing?

Olivier Pascalis and Sylvia Wirth

in Oxford Handbook of Face Perception

Published in print July 2011 | ISBN: 9780199559053
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199559053.013.0037

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

Recognizing the Faces of Other Species: What Can a Limited Skill Tell Us About Face Processing?

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Phylogenetic, epigenetic, and neurophysiological data characterize the specificity and limitations of the systems that support individual face recognition in human and non-human primates. The central question of the recognition of the faces of other species explores the processes that lead to the remarkable face expertise that humans and non-humans develop for members of their own species. This article reviews the literature on categorization/recognition abilities within and across species in human and non-human primates. It evaluates whether it is possible for a species to perceive other species faces at the same level of expertise as for their own species. The neural substrate and the current models of neuronal processing that support face processing in human and non-human primates are described. Finally, it discusses the developmental data pertaining to face processing in human and non-human primates, challenging the view that face processing can be plastic in adults.

Keywords: neuronal processing; face processing; neural substrate; non-human primates; face recognition

Article.  7223 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Psychology

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