Article

Brothers, Strangers and Enemies: Ethno-Nationalism and the Demise of Communist Yugoslavia

Cathie Carmichael

in The Oxford Handbook of Postwar European History

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780199560981
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199560981.013.0027

Series: Oxford Handbooks in History

 Brothers, Strangers and Enemies: Ethno-Nationalism and the Demise of Communist Yugoslavia

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In the forty-five years after World War II that Communist Yugoslavia existed, judgements as to the success of the experiment differed widely. Unlike the first royalist Yugoslav state, which had been dominated by the Serbian Karadjordjević Dynasty, the new country eventually gave recognition to all nationalities within the limits of its own authoritarian ideology. The creation of the second Yugoslavia united Bosnian Muslims, Albanians, Serbs, Montenegrins, Macedonians, Croats, and Slovenes with significant Hungarian, Roma, Italian, and Turkish minorities into a single, nominally Leninist state. What united it was the charismatic authority of its wartime leader Josip Broz Tito and a very large and politically significant army. After the break with the Soviet Union in 1948, the Yugoslav Communists veered on an uneasy path between centralisation and republican autonomy. The Communists showed little respect for traditional culture and religion when they came to power. This article focuses on ethno-nationalism and the demise of Communist Yugoslavia.

Keywords: Communists; Yugoslavia; ethno-nationalism; minorities; Josip Broz Tito; culture; religion; autonomy; Serbs; Bosnian Muslims

Article.  7273 words. 

Subjects: History ; European History ; Contemporary History (Post 1945) ; Cold War

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