Article

Disturbing Irish Poetry: Kinsella and Clarke, 1951–1962

John McAuliffe

in The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Poetry

Published in print October 2012 | ISBN: 9780199561247
Published online January 2013 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199561247.013.0014

Series: Oxford Handbooks of Literature

Disturbing Irish Poetry: Kinsella and Clarke, 1951–1962

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In Ireland, the 1950s proved to be a difficult period for both poets and publishers, and was also a time that became a template for Thomas Kinsella's existential and Darwinian sense of a writing life. Most Irish poets were published in England. Faber, for example, published Donagh MacDonagh and Louis MacNeice, as well as Robert Greacen and Valentin Iremonger's anthology of modern Irish poetry in 1949. Austin Clarke published with Maunsel in Dublin in 1917, and his 1936 Collected Poems had been published by Macmillan in New York and Allen and Unwin in London. By 1950, however, he was publishing small editions of his one-act plays at his home, a venture he called the Bridge Press. Clarke and Kinsella reimagine the defining narrative of twentieth-century Irish poetry, the coordination and sometimes explosive rebalancing of past and present, in different ways.

Keywords: Irish poetry; Ireland; Thomas Kinsella; Austin Clarke; publishers; poets; Bridge Press; Donagh MacDonagh; Louis MacNeice; Robert Greacen

Article.  7387 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (20th Century onwards) ; Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets)

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