Article

Contemporary Northern Irish Poetry and Romanticism

Peter Mackay

in The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish Poetry

Published in print October 2012 | ISBN: 9780199561247
Published online January 2013 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199561247.013.0019

Series: Oxford Handbooks of Literature

Contemporary Northern Irish Poetry and Romanticism

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  • Literary Studies (20th Century onwards)
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According to Harold Bloom, all poets engage in ‘creative misreading’ of precursors in their poetry. Two such poets are Ciaran Carson and Seamus Heaney, although they do not correspond easily to the Freudian model of the family romance through which Bloom viewed poetic influence. Recent creative misreaders of Bloom, including Michael O'Neill and Lucy Newlyn, view influence as more positive than anxious, but in the process remove much of the original energy from Bloom's theory. This chapter examines contemporary Northern Irish poetry and Romanticism, focusing on how the former negotiated, undermined, and competed with Romantic texts and poets. Heaney's work repeatedly engages with William Wordsworth as one of his main adopted influences. The antagonism between Robert Southey and Lord Byron is not reflected in the (generally) affectionate ironisations of Northern Irish poetry.

Keywords: Irish poetry; poetic influence; Harold Bloom; Ciaran Carson; Seamus Heaney; Romanticism; William Wordsworth; Robert Southey; Lord Byron

Article.  5571 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (20th Century onwards) ; Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets)

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