Article

Deep Brain Stimulation For Treatment-Resistant Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Debra J.H. Mathews, Peter V. Rabins and Benjamin D. Greenberg

in Oxford Handbook of Neuroethics

Published in print April 2011 | ISBN: 9780199570706
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199570706.013.0115

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 Deep Brain Stimulation For Treatment-Resistant Neuropsychiatric Disorders

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Clinical Psychology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This article reviews some of the ethical issues raised by the emergence and use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders. Issues include concerns about the capacity of persons with severe mental illness to give authentic informed consent, protecting vulnerable individuals from being exposed to unproven and potentially irreversible therapies, the use of DBS for psychiatric disorders in minors, the necessary organization of the interdisciplinary teams required to deliver these demanding treatments, and the degree and quality of oversight. DBS may be seen as the most recent on a continuum of surgical intervention for psychiatric disease and also represents an adaptation of the first implantable brain-interfacing device (IBID) in clinical use. Consideration of the ethical issues raised by such therapies will protect individuals with neurologic and psychiatric diseases from the abuses of the past.

Keywords: deep brain stimulation; neuropsychiatric disorders; ethical issues; first implantable brain-interfacing device; therapies

Article.  6462 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Cognitive Neuroscience ; Clinical Psychology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.