Prosodic Analysis

Pilar Prieto, Brechtje Post and Francis Nolan

in The Oxford Handbook of Laboratory Phonology

Published in print December 2011 | ISBN: 9780199575039
Published online September 2012 | | DOI:

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Linguistics

Prosodic Analysis

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  • Linguistics
  • Phonetics and Phonology
  • Sociolinguistics



This article presents experimental approaches to prosodic analysis and describes the design and analysis of prosodic corpora of both naturalistic and controlled speech. An important area of investigation within the articulatory phonology framework has used kinematic data of articulator gestures obtained using electromagnetic midsagittal articulography (EMMA) to study the intragestural dynamics of boundary-adjacent lengthening phenomena. This work interprets boundary-adjacent lengthening as a local slowing of the gestures in the immediate vicinity of sufficiently strong prosodic boundaries at multiple levels. Another research area in which facial and gestural articulatory analysis has been performed is that of visual prosody. One method that comes from the study of consonantal contrasts and which has been applied to the study of tonal and intonational contrasts across languages is the categorical perception (CP) paradigm. The CP paradigm involves an identification/classification task in which the listeners have to categorize stimuli taken from a continuum, and a discrimination task in which listeners are asked to judge pairs of stimuli as being either the same or different. The CP paradigm has been applied to tonal languages and intonational languages, boundary tones and pitch accents, and in terms of either differences in peak alignment or differences in pitch height. The gating paradigm methodology is aimed at studying the speakers' online performance with an identification task when only part of the speech signal is available.

Keywords: articulatory phonology; prosodic analysis; electromagnetic midsagittal articulography; intonational languages; categorical perception paradigm

Article.  8691 words. 

Subjects: Linguistics ; Phonetics and Phonology ; Sociolinguistics

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