Article

Trade In Manufactures And Agricultural Products: The Dangerous Link?

Helen Coskeran, Dan Kim and Amrita Narlikar

in The Oxford Handbook on The World Trade Organization

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780199586103
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199586103.013.0017

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Politics & International Relations

 Trade In Manufactures And Agricultural Products: The Dangerous Link?

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The issues of manufactures and agriculture are not new to the multilateral trading system. The apparent bane of many trade negotiations is often the newness of issue. This article examines the negotiations on non-agricultural market access (NAMA) and agriculture and the Doha Development Agenda (DDA). Both areas belong to the conventional area of goods, but these are also the two issues over which the DDA negotiations have repeatedly broken down. The article considers why, after a very successful record of bringing down trade barriers in the previous rounds, the NAMA negotiators have faced repeated deadlock in the DDA and how far the difficulties in the agricultural negotiations are a continuation of the problems that previous rounds encountered, or whether they are a product of interests and processes specific to the DDA. It shows how traditional methods that negotiators use to break deadlock – such as issue linkage, Chair's texts, variations in formulae to facilitate an acceptable distribution of costs – have all failed to deliver a compromise in the DDA.

Keywords: market access; agriculture; manufactures; trade negotiations; Doha Development Agenda; issue linkage; Chair's texts; multilateral trading system; trade barriers

Article.  11431 words. 

Subjects: Politics ; International Relations ; Political Economy

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