Article

Divine Providence

Thomas P. Flint

in The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology

Published in print March 2011 | ISBN: 9780199596539
Published online September 2009 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199596539.013.0013

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Religion and Theology

 Divine Providence

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Religion
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Christianity

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This article attempts to spell out more clearly the Thomist, the Openist, and the Molinist approaches to divine providence, and to indicate the strengths and weaknesses of these three positions. It begins by discussing both the traditional notion of divine providence and the libertarian picture of freedom. The article then argues that each theory of divine providence has its advantages and disadvantages. Each has had numerous able and creative defenders. As with most philosophical disputes, one can hardly expect this debate to come to an end. The field of battle may shift more clearly in the coming years to considerations of which view, when applied to specific doctrines (such as the Incarnation), offers us the most satisfying overall position. Still, it seems quite likely that all three positions will continue to be defended (and attacked) for the foreseeable future.

Keywords: Christian theorists; Thomists; Open Theists; Molinism; libertarian freedom

Article.  11853 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Philosophy of Religion ; Christianity

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.