Article

Buddhism

Andrew Skilton

in The Oxford Handbook of Atheism

Published in print November 2013 | ISBN: 9780199644650
Published online October 2013 | | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199644650.013.004

Series: Oxford Handbooks in Religion and Theology

Buddhism

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  • Alternative Belief Systems
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The article examines evidence for characteristic Buddhist positions regarding the nature and soteriological status of deities. It establishes that deities are but one of several classes of transient entities that need spiritual guidance and argues that by accepting the existence of such entities Buddhism is, according to the operating definition of the volume, a theistic tradition. It also shows that, whereas later Buddhist thinkers developed sophisticated critiques of concepts of a universal God developed within Indian Hindu tradition and are committed to a strongly atheist stance, texts representing early Buddhism tend to be epistemologically cautious rather than directly atheist. This is picture is explored through the exposition of verses from Śāntideva’s Bodhicaryāvatāra and supplemented by reference to suttas and jātakas from the Pali canon. Finally, it dismisses a quasi-theistic interpretation of some aspects of Buddhist traditions.

Keywords: Buddhism; Śāntideva; sutta; jātaka; quasi theism; deities; Pali canon; atheism; theism

Article.  6541 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Alternative Belief Systems ; Buddhism ; Comparative Religion ; Philosophy of Religion

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