Article

‘Nothing Nobler Then a Free Commonwealth’: Milton's Later Vernacular Republican Tracts

N. H. Keeble

in The Oxford Handbook of Milton

Published in print November 2011 | ISBN: 9780199697885
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199697885.013.0017

Series: Oxford Handbooks of Literature

 ‘Nothing Nobler Then a Free Commonwealth’: Milton's Later Vernacular Republican Tracts

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The elitism and exclusivity that are consequent marks of Miltonic republicanism were biblically founded. The argument of The Likeliest Means against a publicly funded ministry had no more effect on the religious policy of the restored Rump than had Of Civil Power on its predecessor. John Milton wrote an unpublished Letter to a Friend, Concerning the Ruptures of the Commonwealth, advising how best to respond to the consequent crisis. Seeking to prevent what Pepys and many others now believed would come to be, Milton once again sought to enlist the support of military power: after Cromwell and Lambert, now Monck. The second edition of The Readie and Easie Way was explicitly directed to the voting public ‘in the midst of our Elections to a free Parlament’. A discussion on Brief Notes Upon a Late Sermon is finally presented.

Keywords: John Milton; Miltonic republicanism; Likeliest Means; Of Civil Power; Readie and Easie; Late Sermon

Article.  10795 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (1500 to 1800) ; Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets)

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