Article

De Doctrina Christiana: an England that Might Have Been

Gordon Campbell and Thomas N. Corns

in The Oxford Handbook of Milton

Published in print November 2011 | ISBN: 9780199697885
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199697885.013.0023

Series: Oxford Handbooks of Literature

 De Doctrina Christiana: an England that Might Have Been

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De Doctrina Christiana opens with an epistle to the reader, in which John Milton describes the origin of the treatise. The decision to write De Doctrina Christiana in Latin probably reflected some of the same priorities, but may have been shaped also by the early history of the project. As Milton explained in his epistle, when he drew material from the great systematic theologians of early modern Protestantism, he was consolidating writing that was itself in Latin. The style of De Doctrina Christiana has been subjected to recent scrutiny. In this article, the theological arguments of the treatise are discussed. Four other doctrines have achieved prominence in discussions of the theology of De Doctrina: creation, soteriology, mortalism, and polygamy. De Doctrina Christiana memorializes an England that might have been.

Keywords: De Doctrina Christiana; John Milton; treatise; modern Protestantism; England; creation; soteriology; mortalism; polygamy

Article.  5789 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (1500 to 1800) ; Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets)

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