Article

Milton Epic and Bucolic: Empire and Readings of Paradise Lost, 1667–1837

Anne-Julia Zwierlein

in The Oxford Handbook of Milton

Published in print November 2011 | ISBN: 9780199697885
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199697885.013.0037

Series: Oxford Handbooks of Literature

 Milton Epic and Bucolic: Empire and Readings of Paradise Lost, 1667–1837

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Literature
  • Literary Studies (1500 to 1800)
  • Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets)

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

This article reviews the political subtexts of the British reception of John Milton – especially the reception of Paradise Lost – during the ‘Long Eighteenth Century’, the period from the first publication of the epic in 1667 to the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837, attending to the ways in which Paradise Lost was both ‘classicized’ and ‘anglicized’ at the same time. It shows that as a result of this process of reception, Milton was constructed to appear simultaneously imperial and domestic. The article then illustrates how Paradise Lost was adapted in eighteenth-century English georgics and pastorals, and concentrates especially on Milton's role in eighteenth-century critical discourses on taste and landscape gardening. In eighteenth-century Miltonizing texts and Milton criticism, both versions of Milton's classical precursor, bucolic and imperial Virgil, were indissolubly combined.

Keywords: John Milton; Paradise Lost; Long Eighteenth Century; English georgics; pastorals; taste; landscape gardening

Article.  9722 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (1500 to 1800) ; Literary Studies (Poetry and Poets)

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.