Article

Creole Kinship: Privacy and The Novel in the New World

Nancy Bentley

in The Oxford Handbook of Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Published in print January 2012 | ISBN: 9780199730438
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199730438.013.0007

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 Creole Kinship: Privacy and The Novel in the New World

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This article examines the so-called Creole kinship in American novels during the nineteenth century. It argues in the first instance that the political origins of the novel are the source of the genre's ability to conduct experiments in imagining subjectivity, the space of interior thought and feeling. The article investigates why novels about New World families knock notions of liberal subjectivity off their stable centers and discusses the explanations of several well-known American personalities on the topic of kinship and privacy, including Abraham Lincoln, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Nancy Bentley.

Keywords: Creole kinship; American novels; imagining subjectivity; New World families; privacy; Abraham Lincoln; Harriet Beecher Stowe; Nancy Bentley

Article.  9267 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (19th Century) ; Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers)

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