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Temporality, Race, and Empire in Cooper's <i>The Deerslayer</i>: The Beginning of the End

Robert S. Levine

in The Oxford Handbook of Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Published in print January 2012 | ISBN: 9780199730438
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199730438.013.0010

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 Temporality, Race, and Empire in Cooper's The Deerslayer: The Beginning of the End

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This article examines the issues of temporality, race, and empire in American literature, focusing on James Fenimore Cooper's The Deerslayer. It explains that this novel both begins and ends the five novels of Cooper's Leatherstocking series and investigates how U.S. empire building infects the relationship between frontier romances and white imperialism. The article discusses the work of Ojibwa Indian George Copway and highlights Cooper's belief that the “cause” of the Indians should be “defended.”

Keywords: American literature; temporality; race; empire building; James Fenimore Cooper; Deerslayer; frontier romances; white imperialism; George Copway; Indians

Article.  8727 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (19th Century) ; Literary Studies (Fiction, Novelists, and Prose Writers)

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