Article

Nineteenth-Century American Literature Without Nature? Rethinking Environmental Criticism

Stephanie Lemenager

in The Oxford Handbook of Nineteenth-Century American Literature

Published in print January 2012 | ISBN: 9780199730438
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199730438.013.0023

Series: Oxford Handbooks

 Nineteenth-Century American Literature Without Nature? Rethinking Environmental Criticism

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This article focuses on environmental criticism and the depiction of nature in nineteenth-century American literature. It explores what nineteenth-century American literature can offer to an era of global climate change (GCC) and describes the works of nineteenth-century defenders of nature including Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and Walt Whitman. The article argues that if the narrative arts can grapple with the ecological complexity of GCC, clues to survival reside in nineteenth-century U.S. literature.

Keywords: environmental criticism; American literature; climate change; Henry David Thoreau; John Muir; Walt Whitman; narrative arts

Article.  9167 words. 

Subjects: Literature ; Literary Studies (19th Century) ; Literary Theory and Cultural Studies

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