Article

Assessment of Voluntary Turnover in Organizations: Answering the Questions of Why, Who, and How Much

Sang Eun Woo and Carl P. Maertz

in The Oxford Handbook of Personnel Assessment and Selection

Published in print March 2012 | ISBN: 9780199732579
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199732579.013.0025

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 Assessment of Voluntary Turnover in Organizations: Answering the Questions of Why, Who, and How Much

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  • Psychology
  • Organizational Psychology
  • Research Methods in Psychology

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This chapter reviews recent research related to the assessment of three questions: why people quit, who is more or less likely to quit, and how much do instances of quitting cost the organization. Assessments of the “why” and the “who” questions together inform the assessment of turnover functionality (i.e., the “how much” question). Furthermore, the “why” assessment indicates which specific interventions are most likely to succeed with employees in the organization, and the “who” assessment helps determine for which employees the interventions should be implemented. Therefore, answers to these three interrelated questions ultimately converge as the critical inputs for practitioners who seek to determine whether organizations should (and are able) to intervene effectively to influence specific turnover instances. Following discussions of the complexity involved in these assessments, a person-centered, clustering approach was recommended as an effective strategy of accounting for the uniqueness of turnover incidents and prevention strategies.

Keywords: voluntary turnover; assessment of turnover problems; turnover causes; turnover functionality; person-centered approach

Article.  17126 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Organizational Psychology ; Research Methods in Psychology

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