Article

The Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality: A Useful Tool for Diagnosis and Classification of Personality Disorder

Eunyoe Ro, Deborah Stringer and Lee Anna Clark

in The Oxford Handbook of Personality Disorders

Published in print September 2012 | ISBN: 9780199735013
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199735013.013.0004

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 The Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality: A Useful Tool for Diagnosis and Classification of Personality Disorder

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This chapter discusses new theoretical and research developments related to the Schedule for Adaptive and Nonadaptive Personality-2 (SNAP-2; Clark, Simms, Wu, & Casillas, in press) in the context of the forthcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), particularly regarding personality disorder (PD). The theoretical underpinnings of dimensional taxonomies of personality traits and PD, and between personality and psychosocial functioning, are considered first. Next, recent SNAP-2 research is reviewed, most notably in the areas of dependency, impulsivity, and schizotypy. In aggregate, the findings suggest that existing SNAP-2 scales cover significant variance in these content domains, but that a SNAP-3 would benefit by increased coverage of each, specifically active/emotional dependency, carefree/-less behavior, and schizotypal disorganization. Information about additional SNAP versions for informant ratings and adolescent personality/PD, respectively, is provided. Finally, the utility of a program of research elucidating relations between personality and functioning is presented.

Keywords: SNAP; SNAP-2; DSM-5; personality traits; personality disorder; psychosocial functioning; dependency; impulsivity; schizotypy; informant ratings; adolescent personality

Article.  17034 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Clinical Psychology

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