Article

The Tale of Two Universal Declarations: Ethics and Human Rights

Janel Gauthier and Jean L. Pettifor

in The Oxford Handbook of International Psychological Ethics

Published in print July 2012 | ISBN: 9780199739165
Published online November 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199739165.013.0009

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 The Tale of Two Universal Declarations: Ethics and Human Rights

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In 1948, in the aftermath of WWII, and before the development of ethics codes in psychology, the United Nations adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to protect people of all nations from harm. In 2008, 60 years later, in an increasingly globalized world, the International Union of Psychological Science and the International Association of Applied Psychology adopted the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists. This latter declaration commits psychologists world-wide to be guided by fundamental ethical principles of respect and caring in all of psychology's interactions with persons and peoples. This chapter demonstrates how fundamental human rights in the world and ethical principles in psychology were each recognized through a universal declaration, how the approach to building a better world has evolved over time, and how the two universal declarations complement and strengthen each other in meeting today's global challenges for achieving freedom, justice, and peace in the world.

Keywords: Universal Declaration; declaration; ethics; rights; human rights; ethical principles; lobalization

Article.  14989 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; History and Systems in Psychology

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