Article

Everyday Distress: Psychosocial and Economic Impact of Forced Migration on Children and Families

Michael G. Wessells and Kathleen Kostelny

in The Oxford Handbook of Poverty and Child Development

Published in print May 2012 | ISBN: 9780199769100
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199769100.013.0035

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

 Everyday Distress: Psychosocial and Economic Impact of Forced Migration on Children and Families

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Worldwide, many children grow up in zones of political violence and armed conflict, where they are affected not only by acute, traumatic events but also by slower, ongoing distresses of everyday life. Everyday distresses often stem from economic and political problems and arise at levels such as individual, family, community, and societal levels. Among war-affected children, common sources of distress include inability to meet their basic needs and those of their families, family separation, family violence, lack of access to education, gender-based violence, stigmatization and lack of social acceptance, perceptions of spiritual contamination, community violence, refugee status, unemployment, and lack of positive life options. Although these distresses have significant psychosocial impact, many war-affected children demonstrate significant resilience due largely to protective factors in their social environments.

Keywords: children; armed conflict; forced migration; everyday distress; psychosocial well-being; social ecologies; livelihoods; resilience; Gaza; education

Article.  11800 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Developmental Psychology

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