Article

Computational Approaches to Composition of Notated Instrumental Music: Xenakis and the Other Pioneers

James Harley

in The Oxford Handbook of Computer Music

Published in print April 2011 | ISBN: 9780199792030
Published online September 2012 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199792030.013.0005

Series: Oxford Handbooks

Computational Approaches to Composition of Notated Instrumental Music: Xenakis and the Other Pioneers

Preview

The implementation of rules for creating music began in the Middle Ages. Beginning with Micrologus by Guido d'Arezzo (dating from 1050 a.d.), rule-based theories governing the practice of music have been posited by numerous writers and practitioners. The advent of computers has enabled new approaches to music to be developed and implemented that would take advantage of the powerful computational abilities of this new technology. The first composers to engage with the possibilities that computers offered, Lejaren Hiller and Iannis Xenakis, both had scientific professional training: one as a chemist, the other as a civil engineer. Their pioneering work opened the way for others, and the field of computer-assisted has grown rapidly as the technology has become more and more powerful and accessible. This article focuses in more detail on the work of Xenakis as his theoretical and creative work have so far proven to be the more influential.

Keywords: music; Lejaren Hiller; Iannis Xenakis; chemist; civil engineer

Article.  10280 words. 

Subjects: Music ; Applied Music

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribeRecommend to my Librarian

Buy this work at Oxford University Press »