Article

Methods of Assessing Learning and Study Strategies

Kathy C. Stroud

in The Oxford Handbook of Child Psychological Assessment

Published in print April 2013 | ISBN: 9780199796304
Published online May 2013 | | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199796304.013.0024

Series: Oxford Library of Psychology

Methods of Assessing Learning and Study Strategies

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This chapter seeks to provide an overview of theories of learning strategies and self-regulation. Learning strategies, academic motivation, and related constructs are defined, and their role in fostering academic achievement is discussed. For each construct, specific strategies are highlighted that have been shown empirically to academic performance. Incorporating learning strategies assessment in a battery of tests is crucial to the overall understanding of an individual, and the success achieved from using these strategies can be far-reaching. Only a few measures have been developed for the purpose of measuring learning strategies and/or self-regulated learning, and most have significant limitations in their utility. More commonly, measures are designed to measure one or two constructs, with little consideration given to the possible interactions of the factors measured. Others are developed primarily for research purposes and may change with a given hypothesis. The School Motivation and Learning Strategies Inventory (SMALSI; Stroud & Reynolds, 2006) was developed as means of providing a comprehensive assessment of learning strategies across a broad age range to be used both for assessment and clinical purposes.

Keywords: Learning strategies; Academic motivation; Study strategies; Test-taking strategies; School Motivation; Learning Strategies Inventory

Article.  21499 words. 

Subjects: Psychology ; Clinical Psychology

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