Journal Article

Ambiguities in Decision Making: Social Work's Response to ‘Glue-Sniffing’ in Scotland

ELIZABETH JAGGER

in The British Journal of Social Work

Published on behalf of British Association of Social Workers

Volume 27, issue 3, pages 361-376
Published in print June 1997 | ISSN: 0045-3102
Published online June 1997 | e-ISSN: 1468-263X | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.bjsw.a011218
Ambiguities in Decision Making: Social Work's Response to ‘Glue-Sniffing’ in Scotland

Show Summary Details

Preview

This paper examines how social workers make decisions about which cases of ‘glue-sniffing’ require intervention, in the context of a government policy which construes the problem primarily within the arena of parental responsibility. Using data from interviews with social workers and research on ‘glue-sniffing’, it shows that social workers were frequently reluctant to deal with cases. It explains that this has to do with factors such as organizational priorities, lack of resources and, in particular, the ambiguous status of ‘glue-sniffing’ within their own professional discourse. It concludes that the complex interplay of these factors means that government policy is not translated into practice in any simplistic manner.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Social Work

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.