Journal Article

The Social Adjustment of Deaf Adolescents in Segregated, Partially Integrated, and Mainstreamed Settings

Carol Musselman, Anju Mootilal and Sherri MacKay

in The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education

Volume 1, issue 1, pages 52-63
Published in print January 1996 | ISSN: 1081-4159
Published online January 1996 | e-ISSN: 1465-7325 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.deafed.a014281
The Social Adjustment of Deaf Adolescents in Segregated, Partially Integrated, and Mainstreamed Settings

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This study examined the social adjustment of deaf adolescents enrolled in segregated (n = 39), partially integrated (n = 15), and mainstreamed (n = 17) settings, comparing them with a control group of hearing students (n = 88). Segregated students showed the lowest levels of adjustment overall. Partially integrated students reported better adjustment than mainstreamed students with deaf peers; mainstreamed students reported better adjustment than partially integrated students with hearing peers, showing the same levels of adjustment with hearing peers as hearing students. Regardless of placement, deaf students reported better or equal adjustment with deaf than with hearing peers. Social adjustment with deaf peers was related to American Sign Language (ASL) skill and adjustment with hearing peers to spoken English. These findings suggest that deaf students can benefit from both segregated and integrated placements as complementary forms of social experience that each contribute to overall adjustment.

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Subjects: Education ; Linguistics ; Teaching of Specific Groups and Special Educational Needs

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