Journal Article

Acclimation of Respiratory Properties of Leaves of <i>Spinacia oleracea</i> L., a Sun Species, and of <i>Alocasia macrorrhiza</i> (L.) G. Don., a Shade Species, to Changes in Growth Irradiance

Ko Noguchi, Kintake Sonoike and Ichiro Terashima

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 37, issue 3, pages 377-384
Published in print April 1996 | ISSN: 0032-0781
e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.pcp.a028956
Acclimation of Respiratory Properties of Leaves of Spinacia oleracea L., a Sun Species, and of Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don., a Shade Species, to Changes in Growth Irradiance

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To clarify the way in which the light available for growth affects respiration in leaves of sun and shade plants, we examined the respiratory properties of mature leaves of Spinacia oleracea L., a sun species, and of Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don., a shade species, that had been grown at various irradiances. In leaves of S. oleracea, the respiratory rates, on a dry mass basis, decreased with time during the night, and the higher was the growth irradiance during the day, the higher was the respiratory rate. The marked decreases in the respiratory rate during the night were accompanied by decreases in the concentration of carbohydrates in the leaves. By contrast, the respiratory rates of leaves of A. macrorrhiza were virtually constant throughout the night and the absolute rates were lower than those of S. oleracea even though the absolute value of the concentration of carbohydrates and its decrease at night resembled to those in S. oleracea. The maximum activities of respiratory enzymes were also similar to those in S. oleracea. However, the leaves of A. macrorrhiza contained less soluble protein than those of S. oleracea. These results suggest that, in S. oleracea, the concentration of carbohydrates might determine the respiratory rate while such is not the case in A. macrorrhiza. The lower respiratory rates in A. macrorrhiza might be due to a lower demand for ATP.

Keywords: Alocasia macrorrhiza (L.) G. Don.; Carbohydrate; Energy demand; Light environment; Respiration; Spinacia oleracea L

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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