Journal Article

Development of Sink Capacity of the “Storage Root” in a Radish Cultivar with a High Ratio of “Storage Root” to Shoot

Hideaki Usuda, Taku Demura, Kousuke Shimogawara and Hiroo Fukuda

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 40, issue 4, pages 369-377
Published in print January 1999 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online January 1999 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.pcp.a029552
Development of Sink Capacity of the “Storage Root” in a Radish Cultivar with a High Ratio of “Storage Root” to Shoot

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The mechanisms that control sink capacity are poorly understood. in radish, a major sink is the “storage root”, which begins to thicken early in development, mainly as a result of thickening of the hypocotyl. We investigated changes in the accumulation of dry matter, sink activity (increase in dry weight of the hypocotyl per unit of dry weight present per unit of time), carbohydrate content, levels of metabolites, activities of enzymes related to the breakdown of sucrose, and the profile of soluble proteins, as well as changes in anatomy, using hypocotyls of a cultivar with a high ratio of “storage root” to shoot. We found that sink activity was strongly related to the level and activity of sucrose synthase but not to the activity of invertase. We also found a significant correlation between sucrose content and the level and activity of sucrose synthase. Our results suggest that sucrose synthase, but not invertase, might be critical for the development of the sink activity of the radish hypocotyl and that the level of sucrose might regulate the expression of sucrose synthase. A discussion of sink capacity is presented that includes consideration of structural changes in the hypocotyl.

Keywords: Radish; Raphanus sativus L.; Sink activity; Sink capacity; Sucrose synthase

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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