Journal Article

Further Evidence That Congenital Dermatoglyphic Abnormalities Are Associated With Psychosis: A Twin Study

Araceli Rosa, Lourdes Fañanás, Jim van Os, Tracy Ribchester, Nadia Davies, Bárbara Arias, Alison McDonald and Robin M. Murray

in Schizophrenia Bulletin

Published on behalf of Maryland Psychiatric Research Center

Volume 28, issue 4, pages 697-701
Published in print January 2002 | ISSN: 0586-7614
Published online January 2002 | e-ISSN: 1745-1701 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.schbul.a006973
Further Evidence That Congenital Dermatoglyphic Abnormalities Are Associated With Psychosis: A Twin Study

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The presence of abnormal palmar flexion creases (APFC) and dermatoglyphic ridge dissociation (RD) may constitute enduring evidence of a prenatal insult that occurred before the third trimester of intrauterine life. We examined these dermatoglyphic abnormalities in a twin study of psychotic disorders. RD and APFC were analyzed in a monozygotic (MZ) twin sample from the Maudsley Hospital in London (11 normal control pairs, 16 pairs concordant for psychosis, 9 pairs discordant for psychosis, 1 concordant triplet, and 1 triplet with one affected member). The risk of either RD or APFC was 44 percent in affected twins and 20 percent in nonaffected twins (odds ratio = 3.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–10.31; one-sided p = 0.023). In the group of MZ twins discordant for psychosis, discordance for RD or APFC always paralleled discordance for psychosis (one-sided p = 0.078), suggesting the operation of nongenetic factors. The results confirm previous work suggesting the possibility that nongenetic factors early in pregnancy contribute to the liability to develop psychosis in later life.

Keywords: Dermatoglyphic abnormalities; ridge dissociation; palmar flexion creases; neurodevelopment; twins; psychosis

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

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