Journal Article

Blue Light-Induced Chloroplast Relocation in <i>Arabidopsis thaliana</i> as Analyzed by Microbeam Irradiation

Takatoshi Kagawa and Masamitsu Wada

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 41, issue 1, pages 84-93
Published in print January 2000 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online January 2000 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/41.1.84
Blue Light-Induced Chloroplast Relocation in Arabidopsis thaliana as Analyzed by Microbeam Irradiation

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Chloroplast relocation in mesophyll cells of Arabidopsis thaliana was observed microscopically and analyzed by microbeam irradiation. Chloroplasts located along the anticlinal walls in dark-adapted cells. When part of a cell was irradiated with a microbeam of high fluence rate blue light (B) simultaneously with background red light (R) on the whole cell, the chloroplasts moved towards the B-irradiated area, but did not enter the beam. The background R illumination activated cytoplasmic motility as well as chloroplast movement. Without R illumination, there was little chloroplast relocation. In light-adapted cells in which the chloroplasts were spread over the cell surface perpendicular to the incident light, R-illumination had the same effect. Under background R, the chloroplasts moved out of the area irradiated with a B microbeam of 8 or 30 W m−2 (avoidance response), but chloroplasts outside the beam moved towards the area irradiated with the B microbeam (accumulation response). These results suggest that the signals for accumulation and avoidance responses were generated in a single cell by high fluence rate B.

cry1cry2, npq1 and nph1 mutants showed B-induced chloroplast relocation. Both the accumulation and avoidance responses were observed in all the mutants, although in the nph1 mutant, the sensitivity of accumulation movement was slightly lower than that of the wild type. We discuss the possible photoreceptor for B-induced chloroplast relocation.

Keywords: Arabidopsis thaliana; Blue light response; Chloroplast movement; Directional movement; Low and high fluence response; Photomutants

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Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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