Journal Article

Effects of Myosin ATPase Inhibitor 2,3-Butanedione 2-Monoxime on Distributions of Myosins, F-Actin, Microtubules, and Cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum in Maize Root Apices

Jozef Šamaj, Mechthild Peters, Dieter Volkmann and František Baluška

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 41, issue 5, pages 571-582
Published in print May 2000 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online May 2000 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/41.5.571
Effects of Myosin ATPase Inhibitor 2,3-Butanedione 2-Monoxime on Distributions of Myosins, F-Actin, Microtubules, and Cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum in Maize Root Apices

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2,3-butanedione 2-monoxime (BDM) is a general inhibitor of myosin ATPases of eukaryotic cells, and its effects on animal and yeast cells are well described. Using immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, we have analyzed the impacts of BDM on distributions of plant myosins, actin filaments (AFs), microtubules (MTs), and cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elements in various cell types of maize root apices. Treatment of growing maize roots with BDM altered the typical distribution patterns of unconventional plant myosin VIII and of putative maize homologue(s) of myosin II. This pharmacological agent also induced a broad range of impacts on AFs and on cortical ER elements associated with plasmodesmata and pit fields. BDM-mediated effects on the actomyosin cytoskeleton were especially pronounced in cells of the root transition zone. Additionally, BDM elicited distinct reactions in the MT cytoskeleton; endoplasmic MTs vanished in all cells of the transition zone and cortical MTs assembled in increased amounts preferentially at plasmodesmata and pit-fields. Our data indicate that AFs and MTs interact together via BDM-sensitive plant myosins, which can be considered as putative integrators of the plant cytoskeleton. Morphometric analysis revealed that cell growth was prominently inhibited in the transition zone and the apical part, but not the central part, of the elongation region. Obviously, myosin-based contractility of the actin cytoskeleton is essential for the developmental progression of root cells through the transition zone.

Keywords: Actin; 2,3-Butanedione 2-monoxime; Endoplasmic reticulum; Maize root; Myosin; Tubulin

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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