Journal Article

Endoxyloglucan Transferase is Localized both in the Cell Plate and in the Secretory Pathway Destined for the Apoplast in Tobacco Cells

Ryusuke Yokoyama and Kazuhiko Nishitani

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 42, issue 3, pages 292-300
Published in print March 2001 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online March 2001 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pce034
Endoxyloglucan Transferase is Localized both in the Cell Plate and in the Secretory Pathway Destined for the Apoplast in Tobacco Cells

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  • Biochemistry
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Intracellular trafficking of enzymes responsible for constructing and modifying the cell wall architecture in plants is mostly unknown. To examine their translocation pathways, we employed an endoxyloglucan transferase (EXGT), a key enzyme responsible for forming and rearranging the cellulose/xyloglucan network of the cell wall. We traced its intracellular localization in suspension-cultured cells of tobacco bright yellow-2 by means of green fluorescent protein-fusion gene procedures as well as by indirect immunofluorescence. During interphase the protein was extensively secreted into the apoplast via the endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi apparatus network, whereas during cytokinesis, the protein was exclusively located in the phragmoplast and eventually transported to the cell plate. These results clearly indicate commitment of EXGT protein to the construction of both the cell plate and the cell wall. This study also visualized the process of phragmoplast development at a level of vesicle translocation in the living cell.

Keywords: Key words: Cell plate — Cell wall — Endoxyloglucan transferase — Green fluorescence protein — Secretion — Tobacco.; Abbreviations: ER, endoplasmic reticulum; EXGT, endoxyloglucan transferase; GFP, green fluorescent protein; LS, Linsmaier and Skoog medium.

Journal Article.  5564 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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