Journal Article

Occurrence and Localization of Apocarotenoids in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Plant Roots

Thomas Fester, Bettina Hause, Diana Schmidt, Kristine Halfmann, Jürgen Schmidt, Victor Wray, Gerd Hause and Dieter Strack

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 43, issue 3, pages 256-265
Published in print March 2002 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online March 2002 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcf029
Occurrence and Localization of Apocarotenoids in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Plant Roots

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  • Biochemistry
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The core structure of the yellow pigment from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) maize roots contains the apocarotenoids mycorradicin (an acyclic C14 polyene) and blumenol C cellobioside (a C13 cyclohexenone diglucoside). The pigment seems to be a mixture of different esterification products of these apocarotenoids. It is insoluble in water and accumulates as hydrophobic droplets in the vacuoles of root cortical cells. Screening 58 species from 36 different plant families, we detected mycorradicin in mycorrhizal roots of all Liliopsida analyzed and of a considerable number of Rosopsida, but also species were found in which mycorradicin was undetectable in mycorrhizal roots. Kinetic experiments and microscopic analyses indicate that accumulation of the yellow pigment is correlated with the concomitant degradation of arbuscules and the extensive plastid network covering these haustorium-like fungal structures. The role of the apocarotenoids in mycorrhizal roots is still unknown. The potential C40 carotenoid precursors, however, are more likely to be of functional importance in the development and functioning of arbuscules.

Keywords: Key words: Apocarotenoids — Arbuscular mycorrhiza — Cyclohexenone derivatives — Mycorradicin — Yellow pigment — Zea mays.; Abbreviations: AM, arbuscular mycorrhiza; MS, mass spectrometry; ES, electrospray; NMR, nuclear magnetic resonance; UV-Vis, ultraviolet-visible.

Journal Article.  5741 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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