Journal Article

Inhibition of Plastid Division by Ampicillin in the Pteridophyte <i>Selaginella nipponica</i> Fr. et Sav.

Yoshihiro Izumi, Kanji Ono and Hiroyoshi Takano

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 44, issue 2, pages 183-189
Published in print February 2003 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online February 2003 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcg028
Inhibition of Plastid Division by Ampicillin in the Pteridophyte Selaginella nipponica Fr. et Sav.

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We investigated the effect of the β-lactam antibiotic, ampicillin, on plastid division in the pteridophyte Selaginella nipponica. Guard cells of plantlets treated with 1 mM ampicillin only often had one plastid, whereas guard cells of untreated plantlets had two to four plastids. We generated a S. nipponica cell culture system and used it to investigate the effects of ampicillin. Treatment with 1 mM ampicillin had no effect on cell division in culture. We classified cultured cells into four types based on the number of plastids they contained: one (Type I), two (Type II), three or four (Type III) and more than five (Type IV). After 3 d in culture, the percentage of each cell type (I–IV) was 29.5, 46.7, 20.9, and 1.9%, respectively. Subsequently, the percentage of Types III and IV increased gradually, reaching 61.9 and 11.4%, respectively, after 15 d in culture in the absence of ampicillin. When 1 mM ampicillin was added, there was a minimal increase in the number of Type III and IV cells, with high percentages of Type I and II cells (32.4 and 45.7%, respectively) after 15 d. These results suggest that ampicillin inhibits plastid division in S. nipponica.

Keywords: Keywords: Ampicillin — Plastid division — Pteridophyte — Selaginella nipponica — β-Lactam antibiotic.; Abbreviations: Fts, filamentous temperature sensitive; PBP, penicillin-binding protein; DAPI, 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole; 2,4-D, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

Journal Article.  3401 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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