Journal Article

Deletion of a Chaperonin 60β Gene Leads to Cell Death in the <i>Arabidopsis lesion initiation 1</i> Mutant

Atsushi Ishikawa, Hideaki Tanaka, Masato Nakai and Tadashi Asahi

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 44, issue 3, pages 255-261
Published in print March 2003 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online March 2003 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcg031
Deletion of a Chaperonin 60β Gene Leads to Cell Death in the Arabidopsis lesion initiation 1 Mutant

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  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular and Cell Biology
  • Plant Sciences and Forestry

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Lesion mimic mutants develop spontaneous cell death without pathogen attack. Some of the genes defined by these mutations may function as regulators of cell death, whereas others may perturb cellular metabolism in a way that leads to cell death. To understand the molecular mechanism of cell death in lesion mimic mutants, we isolated a lesion initiation 1 (len1) mutant by a T-DNA tagging method. The len1 mutant develops lesions on its leaves and expresses systemic acquired resistance (SAR). LEN1 was identified to encode a chloroplast chaperonin 60β (Cpn60β), a homologue of bacterial GroEL. The recombinant LEN1 had molecular chaperone activity for suppressing protein aggregation in vitro. Moreover, len1 plants develop accelerated cell death to heat shock stress in comparison with wild-type plants. The chlorophyll a/b binding protein (CAB) was present in len1 plants at a lower level than in the wild-type plants. These results indicate that LEN1 functions as a molecular chaperone in chloroplasts and its deletion leads to cell death in Arabidopsis.

Keywords: Keywords: Arabidopsis — Chaperonin — Lesion.; Abbreviations: CAB, chlorophyll a/b binding protein; Cpn, chaperonin; CS, citrate synthase; DAB, diaminobenzidine; RBCL and RBCS, large and small subunits, respectively, of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (Rubisco); SAR, systemic acquired resistance.

Journal Article.  4147 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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