Journal Article

The ER Body, a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum-Derived Structure in <i>Arabidopsis</i>

Ryo Matsushima, Yasuko Hayashi, Kenji Yamada, Tomoo Shimada, Mikio Nishimura and Ikuko Hara-Nishimura

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 44, issue 7, pages 661-666
Published in print July 2003 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online July 2003 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcg089
The ER Body, a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum-Derived Structure in Arabidopsis

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Plant cells develop various endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived structures with specific functions. The ER body, a novel ER-derived compartment in Arabidopsis, is a spindle-shaped structure (~10 µm long and ~1 µm wide) that is surrounded by ribosomes. Similar structures were found in many Brassicaceae plants in the 1960s and 1970s, but their main components and biological functions have remained unknown. ER bodies can be visualized in transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the green fluorescent protein with an ER-retention signal. A large number of ER bodies are observed in cotyledons, hypocotyls and roots of seedlings, but very few are observed in rosette leaves. Recently nai1, a mutant that does not develop ER bodies in whole seedlings, was isolated. Analysis of the nai1 mutant reveals that a β-glucosidase, called PYK10, is the main component of ER bodies. The putative biological function of PYK10 and the inducibility of ER bodies in rosette leaves by wound stress suggest that the ER body functions in the defense against herbivores.

Keywords: Keywords: Arabidopsis thaliana — Endoplasmic reticulum — ER body — β-Glucosidase — GFP – PYK10.; Abbreviations: DC, dilated cisternae; ER, endoplasmic reticulum; GFP, green fluorescent protein; JA, jasmonic acid; KV, KDEL-tailed cysteine proteinase-accumulating vesicle; MeJA, methyl ester of jasmonic acid.

Journal Article.  4348 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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