Journal Article

Control of Cell Division and Transcription by Cyclin-dependent Kinase-activating Kinases in Plants

Masaaki Umeda, Akie Shimotohno and Masatoshi Yamaguchi

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 46, issue 9, pages 1437-1442
Published in print September 2005 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online September 2005 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pci170
Control of Cell Division and Transcription by Cyclin-dependent Kinase-activating Kinases in Plants

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular and Cell Biology
  • Plant Sciences and Forestry

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) play key roles in the progression of the cell cycle in eukaryotes. A CDK-activating kinase (CAK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of CDKs to activate their enzyme activity; thus, it is involved in activation of cell proliferation. In plants, two distinct classes of CAK have been identified; CDKD is functionally related to vertebrate-type CAKs, while CDKF is a plant-specific CAK having unique enzymatic characteristics. Recently, CDKF was shown to phosphorylate and activate CDKDs in Arabidopsis. This led to a proposal that CDKD and CDKF constitute a phosphorylation cascade that mediates environmental or hormonal signals to molecular machineries that control the cell cycle and transcription. In this review, we have summarized the biochemical features of plant CAKs and discussed the manner in which they diverge from animal and yeast orthologs. We have introduced several transgenic studies in which CAK genes were used as a tool to modify the CDK activity and to analyze cell division and differentiation during organ development.

Keywords: CDK-activating kinase; Cell cycle; Cyclin; Cyclin-dependent kinase; Protein phosphorylation; Transcription; CAK, CDK-activating kinase; CAKAK, CAK-activating kinase; CDK, cyclin-dependent kinase; CTD, C-terminal domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II; GFP, green fluorescent protein; NER, nucleotide excision repair; NLS, nuclear localization signal; TBP, TATA box-binding protein; T-DNA, transferred DNA

Journal Article.  4159 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.