Journal Article

The Rice Mutant <i>dwarf bamboo shoot 1</i>: A Leaky Mutant of the NACK-type Kinesin-like Gene Can Initiate Organ Primordia but not Organ Development

Takashi Sazuka, Ikuko Aichi, Takayuki Kawai, Naoki Matsuo, Hidemi Kitano and Makoto Matsuoka

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 46, issue 12, pages 1934-1943
Published in print December 2005 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online December 2005 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pci206
The Rice Mutant dwarf bamboo shoot 1: A Leaky Mutant of the NACK-type Kinesin-like Gene Can Initiate Organ Primordia but not Organ Development

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That plant dwarfism is caused by hormonal defects related to gibberellin and brassinosteroid has been well documented. Other contributing elements, however, have not been elucidated. Here, we report on one of the most severe dwarf mutants of rice, dwarf bamboo shoot 1 (dbs1). Most mutant plants died within 1 month after sowing, but a few (5.2%) survived and grew. Vacuolation enlarged cells in the leaf primordia and seminal root before abortion, which disrupted the organized cell files in these organs. Relative to the severe defects in shoot and root growth, the overall structure of the dbs1 embryo was almost normal. Similarly, initiation and organogenesis of the leaf primordia at the shoot apical meristem and those of the lateral root primordia at the root elongation zone occurred normally. These observations suggest that DBS1 is involved in the growth and development of organs but not in organ initiation or organogenesis. Positional cloning of DBS1 revealed that it encoded a NACK-type kinesin-like protein (OsNACK), homologous to the essential components of a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade during plant cytokinesis. A BLAST search indicated that DBS1 was the only gene encoding the OsNACK-type protein in the rice genome, and the dbs1 mutant produced only small amounts of the translatable DBS1 mRNA. Thus, we conclude that the dbs1 mutation causes a severe defect in DBS1 function but does not completely shut it down. We discuss the leaky phenotype of dbs1 under the restricted functioning of OsNACK.

Keywords: Cytokinesis; DBS1; Morphogenesis; Organogenesis; OsNACK; Rice mutant; BR, brassinosteroid; RT–PCR, reverse transcription–PCR; SAM, shoot apical meristem; WT, wild type

Journal Article.  6246 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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