Journal Article

Reversal by Green Light of Blue Light-stimulated Stomatal Opening in Intact, Attached Leaves of Arabidopsis Operates Only in the Potassium-dependent, Morning Phase of Movement

Lawrence D. Talbott, Jamila W. Hammad, Lucy Cien Harn, Vi Hai Nguyen, Jaynita Patel and Eduardo Zeiger

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 47, issue 3, pages 332-339
Published in print March 2006 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online March 2006 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pci249
Reversal by Green Light of Blue Light-stimulated Stomatal Opening in Intact, Attached Leaves of Arabidopsis Operates Only in the Potassium-dependent, Morning Phase of Movement

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Green light reversal of blue light-stimulated stomatal opening was discovered in isolated stomata. The present study shows that the response also occurs in stomata from intact leaves. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were grown in a growth chamber under blue, red and green light. Removal of the green light opened the stomata and restoration of green light closed them to baseline values under experimental conditions that rule out a mesophyll-mediated effect. Assessment of the response to green light over a daily time course showed that the stomatal sensitivity to green light was observed only in the morning, which coincided with the use of potassium as a guard cell osmoticum. Sensitivity to green light was absent during the afternoon phase of stomatal movement, which was previously shown to be dominated by sucrose osmoregulation in Vicia faba. Hence, the shift away from potassium-based osmoregulation in guard cells is further postulated to entail a shift from blue light to photosynthesis as the primary component of the stomatal response to light. Stomata from intact leaves of the zeaxanthin-less, npq1 mutant of Arabidopsis failed to respond to the removal or restoration of green light in the growth chamber, or to short, high fluence pulses of blue or green light. These data confirm previous studies showing that npq1 stomata are devoid of a specific blue light response. In contrast, stomata from intact leaves of phot1 phot2 double mutant plants had a reduced but readily detectable response to the removal of green light and to blue and green pulses.

Keywords: Arabidopsis; Blue light; Green light; Guard cells; Potassium; Zeaxanthin

Journal Article.  5514 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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