Journal Article

Oncogene <i>6b</i> from <i>Agrobacterium tumefaciens</i> Induces Abaxial Cell Division at Late Stages of Leaf Development and Modifies Vascular Development in Petioles

Shinji Terakura, Saeko Kitakura, Masaki Ishikawa, Yoshihisa Ueno, Tomomichi Fujita, Chiyoko Machida, Hiroetsu Wabiko and Yasunori Machida

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 47, issue 5, pages 664-672
Published in print May 2006 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online May 2006 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcj036
Oncogene 6b from Agrobacterium tumefaciens Induces Abaxial Cell Division at Late Stages of Leaf Development and Modifies Vascular Development in Petioles

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The 6b gene in the T-DNA region of the Ti plasmids of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and A. vitis is able to generate shooty calli in phytohormone-free culture of leaf sections of tobacco transformed with 6b. In the present study, we report characteristic morphological abnormalities of the leaves of transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis that express 6b from pTiAKE10 (AK-6b), and altered expression of genes related to cell division and meristem formation in the transgenic plants. Cotyledons and leaves of both transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis exhibited various abnormalities including upward curling of leaf blades, and transgenic tobacco leaves produced leaf-like outgrowths from the abaxial side. Transcripts of some class 1 KNOX homeobox genes, which are thought to be related to meristem functions, and cell cycle regulating genes were ectopically accumulated in mature leaves. M phase-specific genes were also ectopically expressed at the abaxial sides of mature leaves. These results suggest that the AK-6b gene stimulates the cellular potential for division and meristematic functions preferentially in the abaxial side of leaves and that the leaf phenotypes generated by AK-6b are at least in part due to such biased cell division during polar development of leaves. The results of the present experiments with a fusion gene between the AK-6b gene and the glucocorticoid receptor gene showed that nuclear import of the AK-6b protein was essential for upward curling of leaves and hormone-free callus formation, suggesting a role for AK-6b in nuclear events.

Keywords: Class 1 KNOX homeobox genes; Ectopic cell division; Leaf development; Oncogene 6b; Vascular development; DEX, dexamethasone; GFP, green fluorescent protein; GR, glucocorticoid receptor; P35S, 35S promoter

Journal Article.  6112 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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