Journal Article

Disruption of a Gene Encoding C<sub>4</sub>-Dicarboxylate Transporter-Like Protein Increases Ozone Sensitivity Through Deregulation of the Stomatal Response in <i>Arabidopsis thaliana</i>

Shoko Saji, Srinivas Bathula, Akihiro Kubo, Masanori Tamaoki, Machi Kanna, Mitsuko Aono, Nobuyoshi Nakajima, Tatsuro Nakaji, Tomomi Takeda, Munehiko Asayama and Hikaru Saji

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 49, issue 1, pages 2-10
Published in print January 2008 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online January 2008 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcm174
Disruption of a Gene Encoding C4-Dicarboxylate Transporter-Like Protein Increases Ozone Sensitivity Through Deregulation of the Stomatal Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

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  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular and Cell Biology
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To understand better the plant response to ozone, we isolated and characterized an ozone-sensitive (ozs1) mutant strain from a set of T-DNA-tagged Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia. The mutant plants show enhanced sensitivity to ozone, desiccation and sulfur dioxide, but have normal sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, low temperature and high light levels. The T-DNA was inserted at a single locus which is linked to ozone sensitivity. Identification of the genomic sequences flanking the T-DNA insertion revealed disruption of a gene encoding a transporter-like protein of the tellurite resistance/C4-dicarboxylate transporter family. Plants with either of two different T-DNA insertions in this gene were also sensitive to ozone, and these plants failed to complement ozs1. Transpiration levels, stomatal conductance levels and the size of stomatal apertures were greater in ozs1 mutant plants than in the wild type. The stomatal apertures of ozs1 mutant plants responded to light fluctuations but were always larger than those of the wild-type plants under the same conditions. The stomata of the mutant and wild-type plants responded similarly to stimuli such as light, abscisic acid, high concentrations of carbon dioxide and ozone. These results suggest that OZS1 helps to close stomata, being not involved in the responses to these signals.

Keywords: Arabidopsis thaliana; Mutant; Oxidative stress; Ozone; Stomata; Transporter

Journal Article.  4838 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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