Journal Article

Phenome Analysis in Plant Species Using Loss-of-Function and Gain-of-Function Mutants

Takashi Kuromori, Shinya Takahashi, Youichi Kondou, Kazuo Shinozaki and Minami Matsui

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 50, issue 7, pages 1215-1231
Published in print July 2009 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online June 2009 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcp078
Phenome Analysis in Plant Species Using Loss-of-Function and Gain-of-Function Mutants

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  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular and Cell Biology
  • Plant Sciences and Forestry

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Analysis of genetic mutations is one of the most effective ways to investigate gene function. We now have methods that allow for mass production of mutant lines and cells in a variety of model species. Recently, large numbers of mutant lines have been generated by both ‘loss-of-function’ and ‘gain-of-function’ techniques. In parallel, phenotypic information covering various mutant resources has been acquired and released in web-based databases. As a result, significant progress in comprehensive pheno-type analysis is being made through the use of these tools. Arabidopsis and rice are two major model plant species in which genome sequencing projects have been completed. Arabidopsis is the most widely used experimental plant, with a large number of mutant resources and several examples of systematic phenotype analysis. Rice is a major crop species and is used as a model plant, with an increasing number of mutant resources. Other plant species are also being employed in functional genetics research. In this review, the present status of mutant resources for large-scale studies of gene function in plant research and the current perspective on using loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutants in phenome research will be discussed.

Keywords: Activation tagging; FOX hunting system; Insertional mutation; Phenome; Saturation mutagenesis; Visible phenotype

Journal Article.  9152 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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