Journal Article

Resistant and Susceptible Responses in Tomato to Cyst Nematode are Differentially Regulated by Salicylic Acid

Taketo Uehara, Shunpei Sugiyama, Hideyuki Matsuura, Tsutomu Arie and Chikara Masuta

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 51, issue 9, pages 1524-1536
Published in print September 2010 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online July 2010 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcq109
Resistant and Susceptible Responses in Tomato to Cyst Nematode are Differentially Regulated by Salicylic Acid

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To understand the machinery underlying a tomato cultivar harboring the Hero A gene against cyst nematode using microarrays, we first analyzed tomato gene expression in response to potato cyst nematode (PCN; Globodera rostochiensis) during the early incompatible and compatible interactions at 3 and 7 days post-inoculation (dpi). Transcript levels of the phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and Myb-related genes were up-regulated at 3 dpi in the incompatible interaction. Transcription of the genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was also up-regulated at 3 dpi in the incompatible interaction. On the other hand, the four genes (PAL, Myb, PDC and ADH) were down-regulated in the compatible interaction at 3 dpi. When the expression levels of several pathogenesis-related (PR) protein genes in tomato roots were compared between the incompatible and compatible interactions, the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent PR genes were found to be induced in the incompatible interaction at 3 dpi. The PR-1(P4) transcript increased to an exceptionally high level at 3 dpi in the cyst nematode-infected resistant plants compared with the uninoculated controls. The free SA levels were elevated to similar levels in both incompatible and compatible interactions. We then confirmed that PR-1(P4) was not significantly induced in the NahG tomato harboring the Hero A gene, compared with the resistant cultivar. We thus found that PR-1(P4) was a hallmark for the cultivar resistance conferred by Hero A against PCN and that nematode parasitism resulted in the inhibition of the SA signaling pathway in the susceptible cultivars.

Keywords: Cyst nematode; Globodera rostochiensis; Plant pathogen; Resistance; Salicylic acid; Tomato

Journal Article.  6616 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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