Journal Article

Photosynthesis-Dependent and -Independent Responses of Stomata to Blue, Red and Green Monochromatic Light: Differences Between the Normally Oriented and Inverted Leaves of Sunflower

Yin Wang, Ko Noguchi and Ichiro Terashima

in Plant and Cell Physiology

Published on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists

Volume 52, issue 3, pages 479-489
Published in print March 2011 | ISSN: 0032-0781
Published online January 2011 | e-ISSN: 1471-9053 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcr005
Photosynthesis-Dependent and -Independent Responses of Stomata to Blue, Red and Green Monochromatic Light: Differences Between the Normally Oriented and Inverted Leaves of Sunflower

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  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular and Cell Biology
  • Plant Sciences and Forestry

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The effects of growth light environment on stomatal light responses were analyzed. We inverted leaves of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) for 2 weeks until their full expansion, and measured gas exchange properties of the adaxial and abaxial sides separately. The sensitivity to light assessed as the increase in stomatal conductance was generally higher in the abaxial stomata than in the adaxial stomata, and these differences could not be completely changed by the inversion treatment. We also treated the leaves with DCMU to inhibit photosynthesis and evaluated the photosynthesis-dependent and -independent components of stomatal light responses. The red light response of stomata in both normally oriented and inverted leaves relied only on the photosynthesis-dependent component. The blue light response involved both the photosynthesis-dependent and photosynthesis-independent components, and the relative contributions of the two components differed between the normally oriented and inverted leaves. A green light response was observed only in the abaxial stomata, which also involved the photosynthesis-dependent and photosynthesis-independent components, strongly suggesting the existence of a green light receptor in sunflower leaves. Moreover, acclimation of the abaxial stomata to strong direct light eliminated the photosynthesis-independent component in the green light response. The results showed that stomatal responses to monochromatic light change considerably in response to growth light environment, although some of these responses appear to be determined inherently.

Keywords: Abaxial side; Adaxial side; DCMU; Green light; Photosynthetic rate (An); Stomatal conductance (Gs)

Journal Article.  6667 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Biochemistry ; Molecular and Cell Biology ; Plant Sciences and Forestry

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