Journal Article

Attitudes of Public Health Academics toward Receiving Funds from for-Profit Corporations: A Systematic Review

Rima T Nakkash, Sanaa Mugharbil, Hala Alaouié and Rima A Afifi

in Public Health Ethics

Volume 10, issue 3, pages 298-303
Published in print November 2017 | ISSN: 1754-9973
Published online August 2016 | e-ISSN: 1754-9981 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/phe/phw036
Attitudes of Public Health Academics toward Receiving Funds from for-Profit Corporations: A Systematic Review

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Abstract

With dwindling support from governments toward universities, university–industry partnerships have increased. Ethical concerns over such partnerships have been documented, are particularly relevant when an institution receives money from a corporation whose products do harm and are intensified for academic public health institutions whose missions include promoting well-being. Academics in medicine and nutrition have often failed to recognize the potential conflicts of industry-sponsored research. It is unclear if research to date has explored attitudes of public health academics toward accepting such funds. The objective of this research was to review systematically the attitudes of public health academics with respect to accepting funds from for-profit corporations. Four electronic databases were searched as well as the archives of the Chronicles of Higher Education. The search strategy was based on four main domains: for-profit organizations, funding, public health and academia. This search resulted in a total of 4017 articles reviewed. No articles were found that investigated the attitudes of public health academics toward accepting funds from industry. The lack of articles addressing public health academicians’ perspective toward accepting industry funds is striking. Research regarding this topic can guide development of policies that minimize the negative consequences of industry funding.

Journal Article.  2195 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Philosophy of Science ; Philosophy of Biology ; Bioethics and Medical Ethics ; Medical Ethics ; Public Health

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