Journal Article

Picoplankton dynamics during contrasting seasonal oceanographic conditions at a coastal upwelling station off Northern Baja California, México

Lorena P. Linacre, Michael R. Landry, J. Rubén Lara-Lara, J. Martín Hernández-Ayón and Carmen Bazán-Guzmán

in Journal of Plankton Research

Volume 32, issue 4, pages 539-557
Published in print April 2010 | ISSN: 0142-7873
Published online January 2010 | e-ISSN: 1464-3774 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/plankt/fbp148
Picoplankton dynamics during contrasting seasonal oceanographic conditions at a coastal upwelling station off Northern Baja California, México

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Marine and Estuarine Biology
  • Zoology and Animal Sciences

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The ecological dynamics of picoplankton were investigated at a coastal upwelling system of northern Baja California during six cruises (September 2007–November 2008). Populations of Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, PicoEukaryotes and heterotrophic bacteria were assessed by flow cytometry (FCM). On each sampling date, we used an abbreviated three-treatment dilution technique and 14C-uptake experiments to determine population (FCM) and community (TChl a) rates of growth, grazing and production from 24-h in situ incubations at three to four euphotic depths. Overall, picoplankton comprised an active and important component of the community, with biomass values (2.3–69.8 µg C L−1) and production rates (0.8–68.4µg C L−1 day−1) that varied positively with Chl a and community 14C-production. The exception was an intense algal bloom (>25 µg Chl a L−1) during La Niña-intensified upwelling conditions in April 2008, during which biomass and production estimates of picophytoplankton were at their lowest levels, suggesting that the smallest primary producers were being replaced by larger cells. Thus, for most of the environmental circumstances encountered during our study, our results supported the recent “rising tide” hypothesis that improved growth (nutrient) conditions benefit all size classes, including picophytoplankton. Under extreme conditions of upwelling, however, the picophytoplankton declined abruptly, despite seemingly strong (average) growth rates. Future studies need to provide a better mechanistic understanding of the physical (advection), physiological (nutrient uptake and temperature) and ecological (food web) factors that result in this dramatic nonlinearity in picophytoplankton response to system forcing and richness.

Keywords: picoplankton dynamics; dilution method; growth rate; grazing rate; coastal upwelling system

Journal Article.  9626 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Marine and Estuarine Biology ; Zoology and Animal Sciences

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.