Journal Article

The occurrence of lower limb enthesopathy in coeliac disease patients without clinical signs of articular involvement

Mariangela Atteno, Luisa Costa, Raffaella Tortora, Antonio Cozzolino, Antonio Del Puente, Francesco Caso, Paolo Sfriso, Raffaele Scarpa and Carolina Ciacci

in Rheumatology

Volume 52, issue 5, pages 893-897
Published in print May 2013 | ISSN: 1462-0324
Published online January 2013 | e-ISSN: 1462-0332 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kes380
The occurrence of lower limb enthesopathy in coeliac disease patients without clinical signs of articular involvement

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Objective. Coeliac disease (CD) is a systemic autoimmune condition induced by gluten consumption in genetically predisposed people, affecting ∼1% of the general population. In the literature, there are many studies that report the association between CD and different kinds of arthritis. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of entheseal abnormalities by US in patients with CD without clinical signs of articular involvement as compared with healthy control subjects.

Methods. Sixty patients with CD attending the gastroenterology outpatient clinic of the University Federico II of Naples and 60 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex were enrolled in this study. Coeliac patients and healthy controls underwent clinical and US examination.

Results. Among 60 CD patients, 24 (40%) presented at least one entheseal alteration as compared with 6 (10%) control subjects (P < 0.01). In CD patients, the entheseal site more frequently involved was patellar (distal and proximal), while in the healthy controls the enthesopathies were all localized at the Achilles tendon.

Conclusion. In conclusion, the results of this study underline the ability of US to detect signs of subclinical enthesopathy and indicate the presence of a higher prevalence of subclinical enthesopathies in asymptomatic CD patients.

Keywords: coeliac disease; enthesopathy; ultrasound

Journal Article.  2543 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Rheumatology

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