Journal Article

Temporolimbic or Transcallosal Connections: Where Is the Primary Lesion in Schizophrenia and What Is Its Nature?

Timothy J. Crow

in Schizophrenia Bulletin

Published on behalf of Maryland Psychiatric Research Center

Volume 23, issue 3, pages 521-523
Published in print January 1997 | ISSN: 0586-7614
Published online January 1997 | e-ISSN: 1745-1701 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/23.3.521
Temporolimbic or Transcallosal Connections: Where Is the Primary Lesion in Schizophrenia and What Is Its Nature?

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A critique of the article by Bogerts on the temporolimbic system theory is presented. Schizophrenia is conceived as arising as a component of the diversity of interhemispheric (callosal) connectivity associated with the evolution of language, a process that occurred through a genetic change (the speciation event) that allowed the hemispheres to develop with a degree of independence. Language and psychosis thus have a common evolutionary origin. The anatomical changes can be considered as a boundary component of the anatomical variation that is characteristic of the species.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

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