Journal Article

The Micro-Module Learning Tests: Work-Sample Assessments of Responsiveness to Skills Training

Steven M Silverstein, Charles J Wallace and Lindsay S Schenkel

in Schizophrenia Bulletin

Published on behalf of Maryland Psychiatric Research Center

Volume 31, issue 1, pages 73-83
Published in print January 2005 | ISSN: 0586-7614
Published online January 2005 | e-ISSN: 1745-1701 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbi008
The Micro-Module Learning Tests: Work-Sample Assessments of Responsiveness to Skills Training

Show Summary Details

Preview

While outcome of psychiatric rehabilitation has been successfully predicted by cognitive tests, efforts to design a measure to assess responsiveness to rehabilitation have been lacking. In this report, we describe the rationale for and development of a face-valid measure of responsivity to the three core components of skills training: responsiveness to verbal instruction, ability to learn from viewing the behavior of a model, and ability to demonstrate skills observed during a subsequent role-play. Seven alternate forms of the new measure, called the Micro-Module Learning Test (MMLT), demonstrated adequate internal consistency and alternate-form reliability. We also present results from four studies in which the MMLT was used to collect normative data as well as data on relationships with symptoms, cognitive tests, and treatment outcome. Results indicate that the MMLT is associated with cognitive factors found to predict treatment outcome in prior studies (e.g., verbal memory and fluency), as well as lesser investigated functions such as theory of mind ability. In addition, MMLT scores were correlated negatively with psychotic disorganization and positively with performance during a full-length skills training group. The MMLT appears to be a reliable and valid measure for rapidly assessing responsiveness to skills training procedures.

Keywords: Schizophrenia; rehabilitation; assessment; skills training; cognition; disorganization; outcome

Journal Article.  8919 words. 

Subjects: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.