Journal Article

Aberrant Hippocampal Connectivity in Unmedicated Patients With Schizophrenia and Effects of Antipsychotic Medication: A Longitudinal Resting State Functional MRI Study

Nina Vanessa Kraguljac, David Matthew White, Nathan Hadley, Jennifer Ann Hadley, Lawrence ver Hoef, Ebony Davis and Adrienne Carol Lahti

in Schizophrenia Bulletin

Published on behalf of University of Maryland School of Medicine

Volume 42, issue 4, pages 1046-1055
Published in print July 2016 | ISSN: 0586-7614
Published online February 2016 | e-ISSN: 1745-1701 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbv228
Aberrant Hippocampal Connectivity in Unmedicated Patients With Schizophrenia and Effects of Antipsychotic Medication: A Longitudinal Resting State Functional MRI Study

Show Summary Details

Preview

To better characterize hippocampal pathophysiology in schizophrenia, we conducted a longitudinal study evaluating hippocampal functional connectivity during resting state, using seeds prescribed in its anterior and posterior regions. We enrolled 34 unmedicated patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (SZ) and 34 matched healthy controls. SZ were scanned while off medication, then were treated with risperidone for 6 weeks and re-scanned (n = 22). Group differences in connectivity, as well as changes in connectivity over time, were assessed on the group’s participant level functional connectivity maps. We found significant dysconnectivity with anterior and posterior hippocampal seeds in unmedicated SZ. Baseline connectivity between the hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex, caudate nucleus, auditory cortex and calcarine sulcus in SZ predicted subsequent response to antipsychotic medications. These same regions demonstrated changes over the 6-week treatment trial that were correlated with symptomatic improvement. Our findings implicate several neural networks relevant to clinical improvement with antipsychotic medications.

Keywords: treatment response; frontal cortex; caudate; auditory cortex; functional MRI; risperidone

Journal Article.  6009 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.