Journal Article

Trends in Religious Stratification: Have Religious Group Socioeconomic Distinctions Declined in Recent Decades?

Ralph E. Pyle

in Sociology of Religion

Published on behalf of Association for the Sociology of Religion

Volume 67, issue 1, pages 61-79
Published in print January 2006 | ISSN: 1069-4404
Published online January 2006 | e-ISSN: 1759-8818 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/socrel/67.1.61
Trends in Religious Stratification: Have Religious Group Socioeconomic Distinctions Declined in Recent Decades?

Show Summary Details

Preview

This study examines the degree to which religious group socioeconomic differences have declined during the period from 1972–2000. There has been some debate in the literature regarding the blurring of religious group socioeconomic distinctions, and this paper will outline the conflicting positions on this issue. An analysis of national survey data reveals some improvement in the relative socioeconomic positioning of Black and Conservative Protestants from the 1970s through the 1990s. However, Liberal Protestants and Jews continue to rank highest in income, education, and occupational prestige. Catholics and Moderate Protestants score near the national mean on these measures, and Black Protestants and Conservative Protestants rank lowest on socioeconomic indicators. The most noteworthy change includes a decline in the relative socioeconomic standing of those with no religious preference.

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Religion ; Sociology of Religion

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.